approachingthehill

Focusing on Italian Genealogy and uncovering the testa duras in my family tree

Salvatore Cuba, Sicily – 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Salvatore Cuba is the relative that has a birth date closest to mine. Salvatore was born on September 24, 1878 in the seaside town of Gela, Sicily. He is the oldest son of Luigi Cuba and Rosaria DiMenza. Sometime between 1878 and 1884, the family moved 60 km inland to Caltanissetta, Sicily where three more sons were born. The younger sons, Michele, Giovanni and Giuseppe all eventually moved to America, but Salvatore never did. He died in Caltanisetta on March 10, 1960.

My father has talked about his uncles Mike and Joe, but I have never heard any stories about Salvatore. Did he ever visit his brothers in America? Did anyone ever travel back to Italy to visit Salvatore? I can find no evidence of either.

I have mentioned before the Italian tradition of naming children after grandparents. First born sons are named after their father’s father. Second born sons are named after their mother’s father. First born daughters are named after their father’s mother. Second born daughters are named after their mother’s mother. Remaining children are usually named after the parent’s brothers and sisters. Brothers Michele, Giovanni and Giuseppe all named their oldest sons Luigi Cuba!

Since Salvatore was Luigi’s oldest son, I can assume that Luigi’s father’s name was Salvatore, but I haven’t been able to verify this. I do know that Rosaria’s father’s name was Salvatore, so perhaps Salvatore Cuba was a second born son and I don’t have any information about the first born. Or perhaps both grandfathers were named Salvatore.

To research my Italian ancestors, I have had to order microfilm from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City and spend hours in front of a microfilm reader. Fortunately, more and more Italian Civil Records are being loaded online at FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com which makes research easier.

Corso And Monument Umberto I. Caltanissetta, Sicily 1934; Photo by: TCI/EyeOn/UIG via Getty Images

Corso And Monument Umberto I. Caltanissetta 1934

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